Palais de la Decouverte science museum at the Grand Palais in Paris

The Palais de la Decouverte is a science museum found within the Grand Palais in the heart of Paris which has a very different, yet unique, way of showing and allowing people to discover science to help everyone understand it.

The history of the Palais de la Decouverte is a somewhat unlikely beginning, with the French physicist, Jean Perrin, who won a Nobel prize for his work on the atom, thought up the idea of a unique museum. And although his envisions of the museum was only meant to be a temporary exhibition for the World Fair in 1937, the amazing success of his experiments being performed in front of the public as well as letting visitors take part, it was decided to be changed into a permanent science museum, so many more could enjoy the science and learn.

Nowadays the museum in Paris stays with the same ideas and approach that Perrin wanted to achieve with his idea, to allow many people to access and gain an understanding of any type of science, even those without much prior knowledge of science to the general public.

The Palais de la Decouverte gives many different opportunities and different ways to understand the Earth and the things around us by experimenting, observing and evening interpreting real phenomena.

The museum also takes excellent use of the facilities and things it has to hand by managing to create a solid foundation and link between young scientists, post-graduate assistants and even to help researches teachers and more to help develop their communication skills, scientific findings and improve their knowledge, and help the link between them and the general public.

If you wish to visit the museum when on Holiday in Paris you will find both a welcoming atmosphere as well as a unique one, where you can find many amazing experiments and demonstrations taking place to help you feel part of science from the minute you enter the museum.

Also for those who are not as knowledgeable in the science area this museum in Paris works with the visitors by connecting research scientists and scientific explainers so they can explain as they go along what is happening in many different scenarios to help maintain an understanding of what is going on and to help visitors learn.

There are also many different areas and sections to explore around at your own leisure to see and understand, ranging form but not just including space and meteorology, electrostatics, nuclear energy, man and his food, thermodynamics, electronics, radio astronomy, computer science and much more, not forgetting the temporary exhibitions which also take place during the year for even more variety.

And yet there’s more; within the Grand Palais and the Palais de la Decouverte, the Planetarium which consists of a 15 meter diameter dome from the company Zeiss than reproduces the star-filled night with exceptional quality, allowing you to see and experience galactic and even extra galactic objects, celestial phenomena, view other planets and much more which is just one of the great tourist attractions in Paris.

The Planetarium has set shows throughout the day which last about 45 minutes, with a speaker to provide an introduction to astronomy and explain different aspects of the universe, which always start with the view of the sky as can be seen that very same night, which if you are lucky and it is a clear night you might just be able to!

In addition to the fantastic works and exhibitions when you look back at the history of the Grand Palais there was the idea for a café, and recently that has been realised, so you can have a break and have a snack such as a salad, sandwich, baguette as well as something for those with a sweeter tooth like cheese cake, muffins and cookies. But not forgetting they also serve both hot and cold beverages such as coffee, juices and more.

Also in addition to all of that, since 2010 the Palais de la Decouverte has been a part of the Universcience group, meaning it is now linked with the Cite des Sciences et de l’Industrie which is the largest science museum in Europe, and one of the most well known museums in Paris which is within the Parc de la Villette.

The science museum is part of the Grand Palais that is found on the Avenue des Champs Elysees in the 8th Arrondissement of Paris, opening from all days except for a Monday, from 9:30am to 6pm and on a Sunday which the times change to 10am to 7pm. This does not include French National holidays, eg 1st May and 14th July, where the museum is also closed. And this cafe in Paris as we mentioned before opens at the same times as the museum.

Due to the situation of the museum it is very easy to access the museum from the RER station at the Invalides stop on line C, nearby bus stops which include numbers 28, 42, 63, 72, 80, and 93 not forgetting the bus tours in Paris which also stop nearby or at the museum.

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The Espace Dali is the only museum in France dedicated to the artist Salvador Dali

The Espace Dali museum is a museum dedicated to showing and featuring art works and sculptures of the well known surrealist artist Salvador Dali, and the only art exhibition dedicated to the artist in France.

The artist himself, Salvador Dali had a very controversial personality, although he was someone who was also extraordinary. He was born in Catalonia Spain, yet spent time in both Paris and the United States before returning to his home town of Figueres.

The museum is on a reasonably small scale, but not to be over looked with a variety of unusual lighting, black walls and other things, which create an unusual atmosphere and give a great view into the works and life of the surrealist artist.

With all various types of art there is bound to be something to capture the attention of anyone who goes there, from the bizarre to the fantastic works which include and cover topics from religion, science and more, the museum can show most, allowing you to see some of the works from the famous artist Salvador Dali.

The Espace Dali museum holds many of the original sculptures produced by the artist, and being the only place in France dedicated to the artist it can also boast that is has the largest collection of works done by the artist in the world.

The museum may not be as well known or as large as others, but it can be a very welcoming and a pleasant escape from the crowds of Montmartre, which is where you will find the Espace Dali in the 18th Arrondissement. And also with over 300 different pieces of art varying from sculptures, graphics, furniture, glass works and much more it’s sure to give a different atmosphere.

On top of that, it is also friendly for all ages, and even for younger children who may be able to recognise some of original sculptures and engravings Salvador Dali made for an illustrated version of Alice in Wonderland. And if you have even a vague idea of the artist you can find some of his more well known works and the reoccurring themes such as melting clocks and pocket watches.

There is also a gift shop you can take advantage of at this museum in Paris, with many different things to purchase such as posters, books, lithographs and even perfume so you can show something for taking a visit to the museum and for memories of your holiday in Paris.

The Espace Dali museum is open all year round from 10am right through to 6pm, and in July and August it is open even longer until 8pm.

There is also an option to buy an audio guide for a cost of €3 and this is available in French, Spanish and English, also not forgetting you can pre-book guided visits in English for up to 30 people.

There are numerous ways to access the museum, including taking the tube, the Montmartrobus and even the Funicular, which is a cable car, to bypass the many steps up a steep hill to the top.

Also not forgetting that if you have some extra time, this museum is also near to some other tourist attractions in Paris that are located within the Montmartre area such as the Sacre Coeur Basilica. You can also discover the Place du Tertre, which is a popular square in Paris where you can discover different artists selling their works or even have your portrait done. Yet there is also the Espace Dali Gallery, which offers you a unique collection filled with limited edition sculptures and engravings that you can buy produced as copies from the original works of the surrealist artist Salvador Dali.

The impressive sculptures at the Musee Bourdelle museum in Paris dedicated to Antoine Bourdelle

The Musee Bourdelle is a museum in Paris dedicated to featuring works from the artist and sculptor Antoine Bourdelle, which is to be found within the studio and apartment where he worked and lived from 1885 in the Montparnasse area.

When you enter the museum one of the first rooms you would most likely come across is the Great Hall which was added extension in 1961 to commemorate a century after his birth. It was made to hold some monumental plaster works, such as one named the Monument to the General Alvear and another called the Dying Centaur, and there is also a bronze copy of this which can be found on display in the courtyard garden.

Another area you can visit is the front garden with a gallery and terrace and it holds one of Antoine Bourdelle’s more signature pieces, called Heracles the Archer.

Further along in the Musee Bourdelle you can find a room which forms part of the house where the sculptor lived from 1885, and even if he did move to a different apartment in 1918 he still used to come to work daily and entertain any visitors here. Which also makes this room a great place to discover some of the more personal items and a few collections he gained himself.

Another place you can find are the studios where Bourdelle would have worked, where the rooms were faithfully preserved by his wife Cleopatre Sevastos and his daughter Rhodia and include the pastels he would have used and much more.

The studio not only includes items he would use to draw but also materials, which show the variety of work he created, including wood and bronze. But not only was it for himself, it was for other students whom were taught by him, including Aristide Maillol, Henri Matisse and Germaine Richer.

There is also a private courtyard garden at the museum in Paris, which holds a lot of the earlier works by Antoine, including Hannibals First Victory, Sappho and also the Dying Centaur bronze which was mentioned previously.

Another extension had to be built in 1992 which was designed by Christian de Portzamparc, who is also known for designing the Cite de la Musique located within the Parc de la Villette, and the new section at Musee Bourdelle allows two commemorative monuments including the Monument to the polish poet Adam Mickiewicz. Additionally this wing also holds temporary exhibitions, is a place for conversation and is home to a resource centre and a graphic arts room.

The main artist himself, Antoine Bourdelle, was born in 1861 within the Midi Pyrenees, which is where he went to school until he enrolled into the Toulouse School of Fine Art, also in the same region of France, when he was only fifteen years old.

At twenty four Antoine won a scholarship to go to Ecole des Beaux Arts in Paris, and took the opportunity, at the same time taking resident at the studio of another sculptor, Alexandre Falguiere. In 1893 he became the assistant sculptor for Auguste Rodin which the partnership lasted for about fifteen years until 1908.

Later on he worked as a teacher but still at the same time worked on his own sculpting and the occasional architectural work, helping to draw up plans for the Theatre des Champs Elysees, as well as creating a series of Frescos as well as the decorative marble sculpture, which can be found on the front of the building, located closed to the Avenue des Champs Elysees.

Although, it was not until a year before his death in 1929 that he started to gain true recognition for his work, having gained popularity for his monument to honour Adam Mickiewicz which was inaugurated some months before he died in the October of that year.

After his death his wife Cleopatre, daughter Rhodia and son-in-law Michel Dufet wished to carry on his dream to dedicate a museum to his own work, which they also believed Antoine deserved the recognition for his fantastic works.

Eventually, the Musee Bourdelle opened to the public in 1949, and it was also in the same year that the Montparnasse area was being changed and improved which the road name also got changed to honour the sculptor with the new name of Rue Antoine Bourdelle.

But getting back to the Musee Bourdelle you can be pleased to know that is accessible for those which are disabled, with lift access to different levels, disabled toilets and large print tour guides for those with sight problems.

Now there are an estimated 6000 graphic works, 2000 plaster sculptures, 2200 bronze works, 198 paintings and an incredible 13000 photographs. But that doesn’t include the personal collection of Antoine Bourdelle as well as the major archive section the museum holds.

This makes the Musee Bourdelle one of the more unusual tourist attractions to visit while on Holiday in Paris, with a lot of history, various works of art and styles to look at, that are suitable for everyone to enjoy.

Holiday in France – Published by Kate Davis – European traveller and author of travel to guides to Paris holidays along with research for French monuments, tourist attractions, museums and much more by helping people to get the most out of a holiday in Paris. – Musee Bourdelle

The unique collection of art at the Musee Jacquemart-Andre Museum in Paris

The Musee Jacquemart-Andre is within a palace mansion which was built during the 19th century on the street Boulevard Haussmann for Edouard Andre, which holds and showcases many pieces of art he and his wife, Nelie Jacquemart, collected through their life.

Edouard Andre was a banker and heir to a protestant banking family fortune, and yet spent his money on collecting works of art. After marrying Nelie Jacquemart who happened to be a French portrait artist, they both collected numerous works, which led to a vast amount of art from all over the world.

The Musee Jacquemart-Andre museum is much smaller than other well known places such as Chateau de Versailles or the Chantilly castle, but on that note it is also more personal. Having been a place to hold parties for the high society of the day, allowing them to admire many of the works which were collected in the mansion.

Once Nelie Jacquemart passed away she left the estate and collections to the Institut de France, so that the house could be turned to a museum for everyone to enjoy and appreciate the various arts they had gained. But even from there, the history of the museum is an interesting read.

The arts collected range from many different eras, places and people from Italian Renaissance art, French master pieces from the 18th century, art by Flemish masters and various pieces of furniture. But it also includes the panelling, frescos, ceiling paintings and even an impressive winter garden, which are just some of the fantastic things you can see at this often over looked museum in Paris.

But forgetting the impressive collection, there are also souvenirs and objet d’art which were part of their private collections which give this museum a more homely and personal feel rather than the more larger and seemingly more royal palaces that Paris has to offer such as The Louvre.

Each of the rooms at the Musee Jacquemart-Andre tells a unique story, but if you do want a rest you can always visit the tea room called the Jacquemart-Andre Cafe, which is located in the original dining room with an amazing Tiepolo ceiling, so this museum in Paris offers you to experience a typical Parisian mansion house which was owned by dedicated art collectors, yet in addition to the permanent exhibitions there are also temporary ones held here every so often as well.

Also found close to the famous Champs Elysees Avenue and the Arc de Triomphe, within the 8th Arrondissement of Paris it is one of the few museums open nearly every day of the year, not including National French holidays.

Typically open from 10am until 6pm, the Musee Jacquemart-Andre museum also accounts for when there are temporary exhibitions on and gives two late night visits a week until 9pm on a Monday and Saturday.

But not forgetting there is also a gift shop which opens at the same times as the museum, and the Jacquemart-Andre Cafe in Paris opens each day although not at the same times, yet both of these are accessible without having to tour the museum.

And by entering the museum you also are provided with a free audio guide which can be available in many languages including English, French, German, Spanish, Dutch, Italian, Japanese and Russian. Which also showcases the history of the Musee Jacquemart-Andre and the permanent collections including information on the Second French Empire.

As you enter, a picture gallery can be seen in an anti chamber which allows people to view the decorative works, landscapes and still lifes where the variety can be viewed all around with high quality works. But also the numerous paintings from the 18th century are just as impressive, which both Edouard and Nelie loved, having collected two oval compositions by Francois Boucher and much more before you enter the Grand Salon.

The Grand Salon, a semi-circular shape which have admirable golden panelling, paintings on the ceilings, over the doors, unique furniture, antique objects and even including decorative arts, it is a one of a kind elegant yet sophisticated room.

The music room, and the upper gallery is where the couple would set up musicians when they were holding one of their functions, but it was also a room which held dark wood furniture and dark red walls, which was typical of the French Second empire.

Not forgetting the many paintings which hang on the walls, an architectural caprice by Panini, a breathtaking ceiling painting by well known and renowned Pierre-Victor Galland, and portraits made by Perronneau.

The winter garden is also another spectacular place to venture into, located behind the music room and under a glass roof which holds exotic plants for a more relaxed time. Yet surprising there is an impressive double helic monumental staircase which is decorated with sculptures, which has turned this area of the Musee Jacquemart-Andre into the Gallery of antiques.

And yet those are only the state apartments as there are more rooms at the Jacquemart-Andre museum to discover, like the informal ones used for the day to day lives of the couple, featuring everything from a Tapestry room, a room filled with their favourite objects and a fresco by Giambattista Tiepolo which came from a Venetian palace, a library and even a smoking room which has a blown glass enamelled lamp from the 14th century and various paintings.

The private rooms include that of Nelie’s and Edouard’s rooms which contain many personal objects as well as personal objects, family portraits and all which give an insight to how people lived.

So as you can tell, the Jacquemart-Andre Museum is something unusual and not too formal compared to other well known and famous French museums, allowing you to visit and explore at your own leisure for an incredible experience while on holiday in Paris.

The small museum in Paris dedicated to the artist Eugene Delecroix portrays his work and life

The Musee Eugene Delacroix Museum in Paris

The Musee Eugene Delacroix is a museum in Paris which is dedicated to the renowned painter Eugene Delacroix, showcasing his work, ideas and more, which is to be found within the heart of the Saint Germain des Pres area of Paris and within the apartment and studio where he lived and worked.

The history of the Musee Eugene Delacroix in itself is very fascinating, the original studio which the 19th century painter worked in was used only after the man became seriously ill and found the trek from his home to where he was working at the time too far to contend with. He found a place on Rue de Furstenberg which he found both calming and bright, and where he stayed for the rest of his life.

However, when he did die in August 1863, as he had no direct heir, his wish in his will was that his works were to be sold at the Hotel Drouot auction house in Paris along with most of his furniture. In fact there are many museums which hold his paintings such as Musee du Louvre, the Chateau Versailles castle and Musee Conde in the Chateau Chantilly. Although many of his personal items were shared among his friends relatives and servants.

After that many different people lived within the apartment but in 1929 there were talks to destroy the apartment.

Not long after there were several painters, two different historians of Delacroix, and an art collector who sought to prevent the destruction of the building by creating a society. Taking the name of Societe des Amis d’Eugene Delacroix, they initially simply rented the studio. Eventually leading onto being able to rent the apartment also with the idea of promoting work by the painter, starting exhibitions from 1932.

Towards the year 1952 the society placed the property for sale and sold the works and collections to National French Museums. Although with the money which was generated they put it forward and brought the apartment, studio, and the small garden.

A couple years later the same society donated the property to the French government under the condition that a museum would be created in memory of Eugene Delacroix. However it was only in 1971 that the Musee Eugene Delacroixbecame a French museum and eventually the apartment, courtyard and garden were placed onto the historical monuments in Paris list.

Although it does not stop there, an apartment which connected to the original painters apartment was brought in 1992, so that it could show even more to visitors, as well as showcase many documents for researchers, historians and teachers.

And more recently in 2004 the museum was handed responsibility to French state, who also owns the Musee du Louvre, to help preserve the museum and the property.

Although many items happened to be sold upon his death, many items such as his palettes, easels, painting tables, a glass he used to wash up with and candlesticks were left within his studio, all of which are now viewable at the museum, along with a collection of photographs towards the end of his life and a portrait miniature of him made by one of his friends, Jeanne Mathilde Herbelin.

This museum in Paris also holds works from nearly every phase of his art career, which cover a whole variety of themes including the only 3 attempts Eugene Delacroix tried at fresco in 1834 when he was at Valmont in the Haute Normandy region of France.

Among the paintings there are also drawings you can see, including many primary studies for paintings such as Chapelle des Saints-Anges at the Eglise Saint-Sulpice Church where he worked for some years before he died.

This section also has drawings made by some of his friends and colleagues, which is one of the museums goal to obtain them all. Such as the already established and complete collection of Eugene Delacroix’s lithographic stones for Hamlet and the corresponding prints.

Adittionally there are also letters and documents of the artists life, with letters sent and received from Eugene Delacroix, including ones sent to his cousin, the lawyer Pierre-Antoine Berryer as well as ones sent to the writer Theophile Gautier and additionally Josephine de Forget who he had an affair with.

Although one of the more touching letters came from Jenny Le Guillou, who had been his housekeeper and soon a very dear friend who was with him when he died, who in turn sent a letter to the cousin of the Eugene Delacroix announcing his death.

Taking a step away from his art career Eugene Delacroix also took a trip to Morocco in 1832 which he was most fascinated by, taking numerous sketches and notes along with various objects from the foreign country, which are now on display at Musee Eugene Delacroix.

The museum is to found in the 6th Arrondissement of Paris, inside the popular Saint Germain des Pres area. And is also noticeably close to the Saint-Sulpice church, which is the second largest church in Paris preceded by the Notre Dame Cathedral.

Musee Eugene Delacroix is open daily from 9:30am to 5pm except for on a Tuesdays and National French holidays. However the museum is not accessible for the disabled and not advisable for children due to the lack of a handrail on a staircase leading up to the museum.

Due to the small size of the museum groups larger than seven people have to make a reservation and are limited to twenty five people including a guide and guided visits are conducted at a separate time form the usual opening times of the museum.

Although there are workshops for both adults and children to enjoy as well as special events and even a marquee can be set up in the garden, which have to be pre-booked.

The Musee Eugene Delacroix is an interesting and intriguing museum with a lot of history and variants of art suitable to visit while on Holiday in Paris.

Musee Grevin Waxwork Museum in Paris started over 130 years ago

The Musee Grevin is a waxwork museum which opened in 1882, and it can be an amazing place to visit famous people which are now in their wax form, some dating from many years ago.

At the museum there are various different sections within this museum in Paris, some of which include some of the more renowned wax pieces including that of Elvis Presley, Albert Einstein, Mahatma Gandhi, Michael Jackson and much more, which are all surrounded by amazing decor around, which in itself is amazing, being put in place well over one hundred years ago.

One section is dedicated to history of France from the middle ages through to the 19th century, which goes through the Renaissance period and the Second empire, which highlights numerous people throughout history, including Joan of Arc and King Louis XIV with his court at Chateau de Versailles.

The museum also offers to highlight numerous celebrities in what could be classed as a “natural habitat”. Many of them being seen in their dressing rooms before a show, within a Paris brasserie and many more scenarios. All of which can include people such as Luciano Pavarotti, Ernest Hemingway, Pablo Picasso, Naomi Campbell and many more.

The Tout Paris Theatre is another display which provides many people all in evening dress, including that of Celine Dion and Elton John and numerous other well known stars, actors and actresses.

Another section is known as the Snapshots of the 20th Century which takes a look into the past to look to some of the major events which had taken place throughout the world, including, but not being limited to the falling of the Berlin Wall, first steps on the moon as well as some unforgettable people such as Louis Armstrong, Jimi Hendrix and Brigitte Bardot.

As with any museum there are always new exhibits coming in yearly, some of the more recent ones at the Musee Grevin can include works made of Barack Obama, George Clooney, Nicolas Cage and Penelope Cruz. But yet one of the more intriguing yet unusual works is a scene from the movie Ice Age, showing the ever lovable and prehistoric squirrel named Scrat who is trying to get to his nut which he always loses.

Not forgetting there is even more you can find out with a “behind the scenes” on how waxworks are made. With children and parents being welcome to go on a discovery tour circuit to witness some of the materials used, and even allowed to touch and interact with some of the components used making it a hand on and interesting visit to understand and also appreciate the hard work and precision which goes into creating these magnificent wax works.

The Musee Grevin has several full time sculptors which work for the museum, allowing to create as many and high-quality wax figures as possible. Taking castings, videos, 3D models and sometimes only having to work off of sketches and paintings the sculptors create realistic and fantastic sculptures.

But that is not all, each sculpture has a whole process to be created, from the hair which is placed individually into it to make it look and act both life like, some models even having over 500,000 individual hairs, the teeth which are created by a dental specialist. All the while the face is created with oil paints, highlighting everything from a faint scar to a beauty spot and even shadows around the eyes. Which the eyes themselves are made of glass with medical grade precision, most times with the celebrity present to preserve the closest colour possible.

Yet the origin of the museum in itself is most fascinating. Back in the late 19th century a journalist and founder of the daily newspaper Le Gaulois named Arthur Meyer wanted some figures to be able to put a face to a famous name, which is something that was very rarely seen by the public unless there was a caricature or a sketch done for the specific person in mind. Thus he wanted to display representations of famous celebrities which were appearing on his newspaper.

With that in mind, in 1881 Meyer discussed this with a man by the name of Alfred Grevin, who was both a sculptor, cartoonist and designer of theatrical costumes whom had often worked beside Meyer to create sketches for his paper. And after running his idea by the other Grevin eagerly agreed to help get the project up and going.

In fact Grevin became so involved with the idea that the place was named after him, which is now why the Musee Grevin now has its name. Opening its doors at first to the public on the 5th June 1882, it quickly became an overnight success.

Only a year later a distinguished investor named Gabriel Thomas started backing the museum, which was a huge leap, allowing it to have more of a rapid expansion compared to before.

Gabriel Thomas was also the reason why the museum gained many fantastic decors, including the Grevin Theatre with many celebrities in evening dress, and also the Palais des Mirages, or Hall of Mirrors with both a sound and light show which was created for the 1900 Universal Exhibition which was later moved to the Musee Grevin in 1906.

And even to this day, well over a century later, the museum is still amazing people even after major renovations in 2006, which has landed the museum a most well deserved spot on the list of historical monuments in Paris.

And yet not to forget the Cafe Grevin which back with the original founders of the museum had an idea to create a cafe next to the museum. And in the February of 2011 that dream and idea became reality, with the Cafe Grevin opening its doors.

The cafe itself is a work of art with a domed glass ceiling in one area, red velvet sofas and chairs along with mirrors and spotlights around it, created a welcoming atmosphere while you have either a snack after visiting the amazing museum or even choose form one of their A la carte options to give even more of a diverse ending to an amazing day, while on Holiday in Paris.

The small museum in Paris dedicated to the artist Eugene Delecroix portrays his work and life

The Musee Eugene Delacroix Museum in Paris

The Musee Eugene Delacroix is a museum in Paris which is dedicated to the renowned painter Eugene Delacroix, showcasing his work, ideas and more, which is to be found within the heart of the Saint Germain des Pres area of Paris and within the apartment and studio where he lived and worked.

The history of the Musee Eugene Delacroix in itself is very fascinating, the original studio which the 19th century painter worked in was used only after the man became seriously ill and found the trek from his home to where he was working at the time too far to contend with. He found a place on Rue de Furstenberg which he found both calming and bright, and where he stayed for the rest of his life.

However, when he did die in August 1863, as he had no direct heir, his wish in his will was that his works were to be sold at the Hotel Drouot auction house in Paris along with most of his furniture. In fact there are many museums which hold his paintings such as Musee du Louvre, the Chateau Versailles castle and Musee Conde in the Chateau Chantilly. Although many of his personal items were shared among his friends relatives and servants.

After that many different people lived within the apartment but in 1929 there were talks to destroy the apartment.

Not long after there were several painters, two different historians of Delacroix, and an art collector who sought to prevent the destruction of the building by creating a society. Taking the name of Societe des Amis d’Eugene Delacroix, they initially simply rented the studio. Eventually leading onto being able to rent the apartment also with the idea of promoting work by the painter, starting exhibitions from 1932.

Towards the year 1952 the society placed the property for sale and sold the works and collections to National French Museums. Although with the money which was generated they put it forward and brought the apartment, studio, and the small garden.

A couple years later the same society donated the property to the French government under the condition that a museum would be created in memory of Eugene Delacroix. However it was only in 1971 that the Musee Eugene Delacroix became a French museum and eventually the apartment, courtyard and garden were placed onto the historical monuments in Paris list.

Although it does not stop there, an apartment which connected to the original painters apartment was brought in 1992, so that it could show even more to visitors, as well as showcase many documents for researchers, historians and teachers.

And more recently in 2004 the museum was handed responsibility to French state, who also owns the Musee du Louvre, to help preserve the museum and the property.

Although many items happened to be sold upon his death, many items such as his palettes, easels, painting tables, a glass he used to wash up with and candlesticks were left within his studio, all of which are now viewable at the museum, along with a collection of photographs towards the end of his life and a portrait miniature of him made by one of his friends, Jeanne Mathilde Herbelin.

This museum in Paris also holds works from nearly every phase of his art career, which cover a whole variety of themes including the only 3 attempts Eugene Delacroix tried at fresco in 1834 when he was at Valmont in the Haute Normandy region of France.

Among the paintings there are also drawings you can see, including many primary studies for paintings such as Chapelle des Saints-Anges at the Eglise Saint-Sulpice Church where he worked for some years before he died.

This section also has drawings made by some of his friends and colleagues, which is one of the museums goal to obtain them all. Such as the already established and complete collection of Eugene Delacroix’s lithographic stones for Hamlet and the corresponding prints.

Adittionally there are also letters and documents of the artists life, with letters sent and received from Eugene Delacroix, including ones sent to his cousin, the lawyer Pierre-Antoine Berryer as well as ones sent to the writer Theophile Gautier and additionally Josephine de Forget who he had an affair with.

Although one of the more touching letters came from Jenny Le Guillou, who had been his housekeeper and soon a very dear friend who was with him when he died, who in turn sent a letter to the cousin of the Eugene Delacroix announcing his death.

Taking a step away from his art career Eugene Delacroix also took a trip to Morocco in 1832 which he was most fascinated by, taking numerous sketches and notes along with various objects from the foreign country, which are now on display at Musee Eugene Delacroix.

The museum is to found in the 6th Arrondissement of Paris, inside the popular Saint Germain des Pres area. And is also noticeably close to the Saint-Sulpice church, which is the second largest church in Paris preceded by the Notre Dame Cathedral.

Musee Eugene Delacroix is open daily from 9:30am to 5pm except for on a Tuesdays and National French holidays. However the museum is not accessible for the disabled and not advisable for children due to the lack of a handrail on a stair case leading up to the museum.

Due to the small size of the museum groups larger than seven people have to make a reservation and are limited to twenty five people including a guide and guided visits are conducted at a separate time form the usual opening times of the museum.

Although there are workshops for both adults and children to enjoy as well as special events and even a marquee can be set up in the garden, which have to be pre-booked.

The Musee Eugene Delacroix is an interesting and intriguing museum with a lot of history and variants of art suitable to visit while on Holiday in Paris.

Cite des Sciences science museum in Paris and the Geode cinema are the largest in Europe

The Cite des Sciences is an all round popular museum, being the largest science museum in all of Europe and the fifth most visited museum in Paris, joining other popular museums such as The Louvre, it makes it an amazing museum to visit which is suitable for all ages and types of interests.

There are some permanent exhibitions at the museum which allow you to be interactive with the museum such as within the Techno Gallery, where you can play the latest games, test prototypes, discover robots and much more.

Another exciting area is the Images exhibition, where you can include yourself within a TV advert, manipulate pictures and more. Other exhibitions include the light exhibition, outer space, satellite, along with enabling you to be able to discover optical illusions, test new sound devices and much more to stay entertained.

Yet even young children are also catered for with a designated area just for them with interactive displays and organised activities available daily, yet teenagers will also be in their element and come away from this museum after having fun and learning or discovering new things to fuel their imagination.

But forgetting the Cite de Sciences et de l’Industrustrie for a minute, you cannot forget the Argonaute submarine, which is just outside, and being a real submarine that served within the French Navy until it was decommissioned, it eventually became an unusual tourist attraction in Paris to visit. This allows many people to visit the submarine yearly and get to see how the marines used to live and work by venturing into the crew stations, torpedo launching area, the radar detectors and much more.

In addition you also have the amazing Geode Cinema which is a very shiny sphere outside which holds a cinema inside and features one of the largest cinemas in the world. And the Geode Cinema In Paris is one of the most visited cinemas in France, but also the largest hemispherical screen in the world showing large format movies.

At first glance the attraction may be seen as more of an intriguing structure rather than a cinema, with its perfectly smooth and circular shape it can act just like a mirror. But it is not to be underestimated at the equivalent of 12 storeys the building can easily tower over you, and the structure in itself is a technological feat with 1,580 bars of steel tubes comprising together to make the structure, and the whole Geode can weigh in at around 5000 tonnes.

For Omnimax films the experience is like no other with the whole screen being able to be occupied by a film it can reach 10 times that of a normal cinema, yet when digital images are shown they can also be up to 25 metres wide which is far beyond the field of vision for the viewer, making you feel like you are part of an image instead of just watching it.

The geode is a fantastic way to end a day, or start it! But with anything you can get peckish, or want a meal while you are out, which the Cite des Sciences wishes to accommodate easily with many different choices available to suite all tastes and budgets.

The first restaurant, Le Hublot Restaurant serves traditional French cuisine at your table and offers a wide choice of dishes to have, and even including that of a three course meal, which is located at the second level of this incredible museum in Paris.

The Cafe de la Cite is an internet cafe in Paris with an option to have both take away and eat-in with various internet points and microwaves available.

Aux Pains Perdus Sandwich Bar, as it says in the name is a sandwich bar which serves both hot and cold food, also located on the second level allowing you to enjoy many sandwiches, snacks, desserts which again you can eat there or take away.

The Bar du Forum and the separate Bar des Lumieres are perfect for a quick coffee stop or to grab an ice cream for children, allowing you to have a short break if you are on either the first, or second floor without a problem.

Among other things there are the little extras you can find at the museum to use to your advantage to help make your time spent at the Cite des Sciences even easier.

Firstly there is a cloakroom where you can leave coats, bags and more which are available for individual visitors and groups completely free when you show your ticket to the museum. Additionally there are also wheelchairs and push chairs which can be borrowed.

For shows within the Planetarium which is all about space there are free audio guides for the sight impaired individuals available in French, English, German, Spanish or Italian. And in the main hall there is also a scale model of the cite de sciences designed for the visually impaired which talks when you touch it to help those understand where they are more so.

Lastly, but not least there is a gift and book store located in the main hall where you can purchase many various items including that of games, souvenirs, magazines, catalogues, science experiments and much more suitable for all people of all ages.

So as you can tell, a visit to the Cite des Sciences along with the Geode and the Argonaute submarine, which are all located at the Parc de la Villette, can make a fun packed day out while you are on holiday in Paris. Not forgetting that there are also other tourist attractions here as well, such as music venues and the Cite de la Musique with its concert halls and museum.